Gut health & fibre

Fibre is becoming more and more talked about particularly in relation to gut health… I also get a lot of questions about gut health so wanted to bring you guys the latest research on it –

What we do know, is that fibre has a positive impact on gut health. Here in U.K., stats show that we need to boost our fibre intake by around 60%. We are recommend to eat 30g of fibre a day and the countries estimated intake is currently around 18/19g.

The UK get most of their fibre from cereals and cereal products such as bread, rice and pasta. It is important to note that refined grains such as white bread, have been stripped of their fibre. This is not to say we shouldn’t eat white bread, but opting for wholegrain the majority of time provides us with more nutrition. Other foods high in fibre include fruit and veg! Often people forget about this.

How does fibre work?

Fibre plays many different roles including helping to improve glycemic controls, blood sugar balance and stimulating the colon. And as know, it is also becoming increasingly famous for its effect on gut microbiota

Fun facts

  • Our gut microbiota, is something we develop with age and it weighs as much as our brain!
  • It has been estimated that we are 45% human and 55% microbes /bacteria by number of cells
  • The gut produces vitamins and hormones, it strengthens the intestine and trains the immune system.
  • It can also communicate with our Central Nervous System

Health benefits

Research by Rossi & Dimidi found that for every 7g increase in fibre:

  • 9% lower risk of cardiovascular disease
  • 7%lower risk of colon cancer
  • 7% lower risk of stroke
  • 6% lower risk of type 2 diabetes

What does 7g look like?

  • a potato with skin
  • bowl of baked beans
  • a portion of veggie sticks (carrots / cucumber)

Jacka et al. 2017 looked at gut brain axis in mental health. The study looked a patients diagnosed with depression and found that dietary intervention may help with symptoms. (Note these patients were still on medication but the study showed that a high fibre diet helped their symptoms further). This diet included 50g fibre a day!

Diet in general (added omgega 3s may also have helped) so were looking at whole diet -not just reliant on one nutrient but it is helpful to look at the specific mechanisms behind it.

Barriers in regards to including fibre

  • perceived as more expensive
  • perceived as boring

But, it doesn’t have to be boring or more expensive…

How to increase fibre in diet –

  • Include more nuts, legumes, whole grains, fruit/veg in your diet
  • Freeze your fruit and veggies – it tends to cheaper and they may retain more nutritional value
  • Buy tins of lentils, beans and chickpeas – they’re cheap and easy to add to meals.

Please note that those who have been diagnosed with IBS may need more guidance in regards their diet and fibre intake and should seek advice from a registered health professional.

References

https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/en/publications/irritable-bowel-syndrome-and-diet(d6c9322c-5079-4073-add7-b803f15131f4).html 

https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/en/publications/dietary-fiber-intervention-on-gut-microbiota-composition-in-healthy-adults(f9b2521e-1513-43f5-9739-777023204fbc).html

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/ 

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